Did You Know Conversations

Did You Know Conversations is a social media and outdoor advertising campaign designed to increase awareness about race and history. The goal of Did You Know is to start conversations that will help people reflect, wonder, learn and ultimately grow in their understanding.

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Small Group Study

Ebenezer Church is offering a Small Group Study of "What Lies Between Us Journal & Guide: Fostering First Steps Toward Racial Healing" by Dr. Lucretia Carter Berry. The study seeks to inform and equip those who feel led toward racial healing but don’t know where to begin. Berry holds a PhD in education and is co-creator of Brownicity, an organization that offers education, advocacy, and support for anti-racism efforts. The book was recommended by Ebenezer’s Racial Reconciliation Working Group, and several members of the group will serve as facilitators for the study.

Participants will purchase the book and read the first two chapters on their own. The seven-week small group study will begin during the week of February 14 and will cover Chapters 3 through 9. Small group discussions will be complemented by the PBS documentary Race, The Power of an Illusion and other video elements. Groups will have the option of meeting in person or virtually.

For details about the study or how to join a small group, please click the button below.

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Books

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 Jesus and the Disinherited by Howard Thurman

In this classic theological treatise, the acclaimed theologian and religious leader Howard Thurman (1900-1981) demonstrates how the gospel may be read as a manual of resistance for the poor and disenfranchised. Jesus is a partner in the pain of the oppressed and the example of His life offers a solution to ending the descent into moral nihilism. Hatred does not empower–it decays. Only through self-love and love of one another can God’s justice prevail.

Why We Can’t Wait by Martin Luther King Jr.

Often applauded as King’s most incisive and eloquent book, Why We Can’t Wait recounts the Birmingham campaign in vivid detail, while underscoring why 1963 was such a crucial year for the civil rights movement. Disappointed by the slow pace of school desegregation and civil rights legislation, King observed that by 1963—during which the country celebrated the one-hundredth anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation—Asia and Africa were “moving with jetlike speed toward gaining political independence but we still creep at a horse-and-buggy pace.”

 Be the Bridge by Latasha Morrison

With racial tensions as high within the church as outside the church, it is time for Christians to become the leaders in the conversation on racial reconciliation. This power-packed guide helps readers deepen their understanding of historical factors and present realities, equipping them to participate in the ongoing dialogue and to serve as catalysts for righteousness, justice, healing, transformation, and reconciliation.

 Letters Across the Divide by Zuercher and Anderson 

A black minister and a white businessman candidly discuss the obstacles, stereotypes, and sins that inhibit interracial reconciliation. Provocative and honest.

Leading a Healthy Multi-Ethnic Church by DeYmaz and Li

In Leading a Healthy Multi-Ethnic Church (formerly titled Ethnic Blends), Dr. Mark DeYmaz provides an up-close-and-personal look at seven common challenges to creating diversity in your church. Through real-life stories and practical illustrations, DeYmaz shows how to overcome the obstacles in order to lead a healthy multi-ethnic church.

  Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson

Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. The case drew Bryan into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship—and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever.

 America’s Original Sin by Jim Wallis

In America’s Original Sin, Wallis offers a prophetic and deeply personal call to action in overcoming the racism so ingrained in American society. He speaks candidly to Christians–particularly white Christians–urging them to cross a new bridge toward racial justice and healing. Whenever divided cultures and gridlocked power structures fail to end systemic sin, faith communities can help lead the way to grassroots change. Probing yet positive, biblically rooted yet highly practical, this book shows people of faith how they can work together to overcome the embedded racism in America, galvanizing a movement to cross the bridge to a multiracial church and a new America.

  Stamped from the Beginning by Ibram X. Kendi

Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. He uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to drive this history: Puritan minister Cotton Mather, Thomas Jefferson, abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, W.E.B. Du Bois, and legendary activist Angela Davis. As Kendi shows, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. They were created to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation’s racial inequities.

 Shalom Sistas by Osheta Moore

In Shalom Sistas, Moore shares what she learned when she challenged herself to study peace in the Bible for forty days. Taking readers through the twelve points of the Shalom Sistas’ Manifesto, Moore experiments with practices of everyday peacemaking and invites readers to do the same. From dropping “love bombs” on a family vacation, to talking to the coach who called her son the n-word, to spreading shalom with a Swiffer, Moore offers bold steps for crossing lines between black and white, suburban and urban, rich and poor. What if a bunch of Jesus-following women catch a vision of a vibrant, whole, flourishing world? What happens when Shalom Sistas unite?

Children's Books

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 The Skin You Live In by Michael Tyler

With the ease and simplicity of a nursery rhyme, this lively story delivers an important message of social acceptance to young readers. Themes associated with child development and social harmony, such as friendship, acceptance, self-esteem, and diversity are promoted in simple and straightforward prose.

The Colors of Us by Karen Katz

Seven-year-old Lena is going to paint a picture of herself. She wants to use brown paint for her skin. But when she and her mother take a walk through the neighborhood, Lena learns that brown comes in many different shades. Through the eyes of a little girl who begins to see her familiar world in a new way, this book celebrates the differences and similarities that connect all people.

Last Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Peña

Every Sunday after church, CJ and his grandma ride the bus across town. But today, CJ wonders why they don’t own a car like his friend Colby. Why doesn’t he have an iPod like the boys on the bus? How come they always have to get off in the dirty part of town? Each question is met with an encouraging answer from grandma, who helps him see the beauty—and fun—in their routine and the world around them.

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 The Color of Compromise by Jemar Tisby

Tisby provides a unique survey of American Christianity’s racial past, revealing the concrete and chilling ways people of faith have worked against racial justice. Understanding our racial history sets the stage for solutions, but until we understand the depth of the malady we won’t fully embrace the aggressive treatment it requires. Given the centuries of Christian compromise with bigotry, believers today must be prepared to tear down old structures and build up new ones. This video study provides an in-depth diagnosis for a racially divided American church and suggests ways to foster a more equitable and inclusive environment among God’s people.

 MLK50: Gospel Reflections from the Mountaintop by John Perkins

Racial unity is a gospel issue and all the more urgent 50 years after Martin Luther King Jr.’s death. Join the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission and The Gospel Coalition at a special event, “MLK50: Gospel Reflections from the Mountaintop,” which took place April 3-4, 2018 in Memphis, TN. Key speakers included Matt Chandler, Jackie Hill Perry, Eric Mason, Russell Moore, John Piper, Benjamin Watson, and many others. The 50th anniversary of King’s tragic death marks an opportunity for Christians to reflect on the state of racial unity in the church and the culture. It creates the occasion to reflect on where Christians have been and look ahead to where we must go as we pursue racial unity in the midst of tremendous tension.

 ONE by Dennis Rouse

As Christians we are members of one spiritual family, pursuing one God, redeemed and rescued by one Savior. But we’re also from different races and different cultures, and we’re influenced by a world that is marked by division. How should the church respond? What is our role as followers of Christ? In this four-session study, led by Pastors Dennis and Colleen Rouse, you’ll learn how our reconciliation with God through Christ equips us to be the voice of reconciliation in our world, how we can grow in freedom from prejudice, how to engage in politics, and how to show love in our daily lives. With biblical teaching and honest conversation, “ONE” will help your church discuss the tough issues of race and culture in ways that honor God and build unity.

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Leadership for Social Justice

Global Leadership Network Guidance & Resources to Equip You
What is our call today in the midst of all the unrest and violence? To do justice, to love mercy and walk humbly with God (Micah 6:8). It is to respond by doing what we can to make things right. It is to name what is wrong and unjust and not be content to let it continue to fester, multiply or even exist. Here we’ve curated the leadership resources to help you do just that.

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G³ Community Services

G³ Community Services is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization founded by Vernon Green, Jr. of GCubed, Inc. and headquartered in Stafford, Virginia. Its mission is to restore, inspire, and empower the family unit through coaching, mentorship, and education;  improving lives and strengthening communities. Through partnerships with Stafford County Public Schools and other local agencies, G³CS offers a variety of programs for students, veterans, entrepreneurs and families.

 

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Brownicity

Brownicity is an organization that is dedicated to advocacy, education and support for healing and antiracism. Founder Dr. Lucretia Carter Berry is is an anti-race/ism curriculum specialist, a writer for in(Courage).me, the author of What LIES Between Us Journal & Guide: Fostering First Steps Toward Racial Healing, a TED Talker, and a Senior Consultant for The American Dream Game.

 

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